Nickolas Muray, Frida on White Bench #5, 1939. Carbon print; 40 x 27.3 cm. The Vergel Foundation and MondoMostre in collaboration with the Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes y Literatura (INBAL). Photo by Nickolas Muray; © Nickolas Muray Photo Archives. Digital Image by Gerardo Suter.

Denver: Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera and Mexican Modernism

More than 150 postrevolutionary artworks telling about national identity and creative spirit

From Oct. 25, 2020 till Jan. 17, 2021 the Denver Art Museum shows a traveling exhibition focused on the post-Mexican Revolution artworks of internationally celebrated artists Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera and their contemporaries, including Lola Alvarez Bravo, Gunther Gerzse, Mariá Izquierdo and Carlos Mérida. A selection of artworks will be on display in the DAM’s Anschutz and Martin & McCormick Galleries. The thematic exhibition will take a closer look at the role art, artists, indigenous culture an their supporters played in the emergence of national identity and creative spirit after the Mexican Revolution ended in 1920. The exhibition also will cover the topic of important woman artists during this period.

Frida Kahlo, Diego on my Mind, 1943. Oil on Masonite; 29.9 x 24 in. (76 x 61 cm). The Vergel Foundation and MondoMostre in collaboration with the Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes y Literatura (INBAL). © 2020 Banco de México Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, Mexico, D.F./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo by Gerardo Suter.

Establishing the Mexican Avant-Garde

Most of the featured exhibition artworks will be on view from the Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection, who assembled a strong collection of Mexican modernism movement artworks by collecting primarily from friends who were active during the Mexican modernism movement. Their circle of friends included Frida and Diego. Credited with playing a crucial role in establishing a Mexican avant-garde, Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera established a lasting legacy through their contributions to the art world.

Frida Kahlo. Self-Portrait with Monkeys. 1943. © 2020 Banco de México Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, Mexico, D.F./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo by Gerardo Suter.

Frida Kahlo, Self-Portrait with Monkeys, 1943. Oil on canvas; 32 x 24.8 in. (81.5 x 63 cm). The Vergel Foundation and MondoMostre in collaboration with the Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes y Literatura (INBAL). © 2020 Banco de México Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, Mexico, D.F./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo by Gerardo Suter.

Rivera – Placing a emphasis on the untold histories

Rivera, long regarded as one of the most influential painters of the 20th century, is also lagerly associated with Mexican muralism. Painting in his own unique style that blended traditional and modern painting techniques primarily learned in Europe, Diego’s fresco murals incorporated social and political messages aimes at reunifying Mexicans after the revolution by placing a heavy emphasis on the untold histories, including indigenous cultures, progressive social thought and interactions with Europeans. Depicitions of these murals will be on display in the exhibition through large graphic displays and projections.

Original artworks, such as his vastly recognizabel 1943 Calla Lilly Vendor painting, featuring two mestizo woman, will also be on view.

Diego Rivera, Calla Lilly Vendor, 1943. Oil on Masonite; 59.1 x 47.2 in. (150 x 120 cm). The Vergel Foundation and MondoMostre in collaboration with the Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes y Literatura (INBAL). © 2020 Banco de México Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, Mexico, D.F./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo by Gerardo Suter.

Diego Rivera, Calla Lilly Vendor, 1943. Oil on Masonite; 59.1 x 47.2 in. (150 x 120 cm). The Vergel Foundation and MondoMostre in collaboration with the Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes y Literatura (INBAL). © 2020 Banco de México Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, Mexico, D.F./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo by Gerardo Suter.

Meanwhile, Frida Kahlo’s artworks that will be on dispaly were inspired by personal experience, Mexican folk art and a world view that embraces contradicitions, often called magical realism. Similar to Diego’s body of work, Frida’s work also incorporates portrayal of mexicanidad, an identity born of Mexico’s ancient cultures and its colonial past that projected a visionary future. Seven of Frida’s self-portraits will be on view in this exhibition.

The shift in Mexico’s post-war modernism movement also will be demonstrated through artworks by Diego and Frida’s contemporaries such as Carlos Mérida and María Izquierdo.

Ticket information: Tickets for this exhibition will go on sale in two blocks. For visits between October 25-November 30, public tickets will go on sale Monday, October 12. For visits between December 1-January 24, 2021, tickets will go sale Monday, November 23. Tickets go on sale at 10 am on each day.

For more information visit the website of the Denver Art Museum